Salt, Sugar, Fat How the Food Giants Hooked Us

Salt, Sugar, Fat

How the Food Giants Hooked Us

By Michael Moss.

Written By Andres Montero

 

The First thing to know about sugar is this: Our bodies are hard-wired for sweets” Michael Moss

The Second thing to know about sugar, is that food manufacturers know this very well and capitalize on it.  Salt, Sugar, Fat How the Food Giants Hooked Us, written by Pulitzer prize winner Michael Moss sheds light on the dark underbelly of food Manufactures such as Kraft, Coca-Cola and Nestle just to mention a few.  If you are a discerning food consumer then I implore you to read this book, or just do what I did listen to it and then buy it and read it again, I believe that it is that vital to our children’s well-being.  Mr. Moss’s exemplary style of investigative reporting takes us into the labs of some of the major food companies and unearths concepts such as the “bliss point” of sugar, which is essentially the optimum level of sweetness or the precise amount of sweetness that makes food and drink most enjoyable.  He also unveils marketing techniques that have been used by big tobacco and have been adopted by the food industry since back in the late 1980s when tobacco giant Phillip Morris acquired Kraft Foods.  This Book shows how our food giants use scientists, laboratories and expensive and subversive marketing tactics to target our kids and a specific portion of the demographic in order to establish a long-term addiction to sugar for the purpose of increasing the bottom line as opposed to ensuring better nutritional value.

“Kids didn’t just like sugar more than adults, the scientist, Lawrence Greene, pointed out in a paper published in 1975.  Data showed they were actually consuming more of the stuff, and Greene suggested there might be the chicken and the egg issue at play: Some of this craving for sugar may not be innate in the kids but rather the result of massive amounts of sugar being added to processed foods”

The companies knew that sugar was being consumed by children by a disproportionate amount and instead of adjusting it accordingly and scaling back, they doubled down and found more ingenious ways to target children by creating fun, colorful marketing campaigns and airing them on daytime kid friendly networks at the approximate times that their research data showed that children within a given age range would be tuned in.  One example of this was shown by the creation of the Lunchable.  There is nothing real or nutritional about Lunchables yet they are made fun for kids and advertised directly to them. I used to love them so it saddened me to find out that the healthiest thing in that box was the napkin according to some articles that were released at the time of creation. But don’t believe what they say, look it up yourself.

“More African Americans chose the sweetest and saltiest solutions”

I initially purchased this book because someone, smarter than me, suggested it. I’m into fitness and thought that it would hold some value in it, but I didn’t realize that it would impact me so profoundly.  I cannot eat certain things now, thanks to this book.  It’s astounding how most of the food made for our children to consume is actually a poison. From the cookies that taste so good, to the sugary cool aid that is so inexpensive. It seems like food has been slowly killing us for the last 100 years. It seems to have been getting worse over time and most of it is due to industrialization.  Some even argue that due to the domestication of plants and animals, essentially shifting from Hunter Gatherer Societies to an agricultural society is when the spiral began. But that’s an argument for another book.  What I suggest is that you educate yourselves. Read what you are eating, start by simply reading the labels of the food you eat and stay away from the things that you consume too much of.

To read more, this book can be purchased on Amazon currently for $9.88 with a save of $7.12 (42%)

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Salt, Sugar, Fat How the Food Giants Hooked Us”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s